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<div style="background-color: #e6ffe6; border: 2px solid #e6ffe6; border-bottom: none; padding-top: 0.3em; padding-bottom: 0.3em; font-size: large;" align="center">'''Basic knowledge of Chinese names'''</div>
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* Mandarin Chinese syllables are Romanized in English alphabet called "[[Pinyin]]" ("spell of sounds").
* Chinese family names usually have one syllable, and given names usually no more than two. Some rare family names have two syllables, such as [[Ouyang]], [[Sima]], and [[Zhuge]]. Each Chinese character is one syllable.
* In China, people state their last names (family names) first, and first names (given names) last. I call myself [[Li]] [[Boxiao]] in China ([[Li]] is my family name), but in western countries, I call myself [[Boxiao]] [[Li]], following the western tradition.
* In news articles, famous Chinese figures are often referred in Chinese tradition, e.g., [[Xi]] [[Jinping]] ([[Xi]] is family name) and [[Yao]] [[Ming]] ([[Yao]] is family name).
* Chinese family names usually have one syllable, and given names usually no more than two. Each Chinese character is one syllable. * Some rare family names have two syllables, such as [[Ouyang]], [[Sima]], and [[Zhuge]].
* It is common for two unrelated Chinese to share the same family name, but sharing the same given name is much less common.
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<div style="background-color: #e6ffff; border: 2px solid #e6ffff; border-bottom: none; padding-top: 0.3em; padding-bottom: 0.3em; font-size: large;" align="center">'''Fun facts'''</div>
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* Mandarin Chinese sounds are Romanized in English alphabet called "[[Pinyin]]" ("spell of sounds").
* Not all Chinese nationals have their names pronounced in Pinyin. Exceptions include:
*# * Ethnic minority names are often pronounced in their native languages, e.g., Aisin Gioro, Bat-Erdene, Mehmet, Tenzin, etc.*# * People in Hong Kong, Macao, and Taiwan regions often use different Pinyin systems, e.g., Cantonese Pinyin or Wade-Giles Romanization. The names of Chinese nationals who lived long time ago may also be in different Pinyin systems. For example, Mao Tse-tung (in Wade-Giles Romanization) is [[Mao]] [[Zedong]] in Pinyin.*# * Some people have English given names or gave themselves English names. For example, Jack [[Ma]] and Jackie Chan (this Chan is Cantonese Pinyin; its Mandarin Pinyin equivalent is [[Chen]]).
* Very occasionally, a non-traditional Chinese given name might have more than two syllables.
* Some people in the past had a one-syllable given name and a two-syllable “style name” or “courtesy name”, often used interchangeably. This may cause confusion when reading classic Chinese novels or studying historical figures.

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